Lychee keep the day sweet.

Southwest Airlines begins service to Hawaii

Earlier this week, plucky budget carrier Southwest Airlines finally began selling tickets to my home state––Hawaii! In a statement, Southwest announced service to the Hawaiian islands of Oahu (Honolulu), Hawaii Island (Kona), Kauai (Lihue––shoutout to my hometown) and Maui (Kahului). Nonstop service to the Aloha State on Southwest begins with California cities including Oakland and San Jose with more information about flights from San Diego and Sacramento to be announced in the coming weeks.

Currently, reservations through June can be booked via the airline’s website.

Of course, you can still get to Hawaii from other Southwest gateways, but you’ll have to purchase separate, connecting flights if you want to fly Southwest. The airline continues to build out its schedule.

Southwest had this to say, as reported by USA Today, “As we continue to add service to Hawaii and increase some of our technical capabilities, we will only see more cities gain connections to the state.”


Hanalei Bay, Kauai

In the meantime, if you’re planning a trip to Hawaii, I’m resurfacing some of my favorite bylines to help inspire your time in the islands regardless if you’re flying Southwest or not:

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Sometimes I go to DeskHub to commune with other humans.

As a freelance travel writer based in San Diego, I work almost exclusively from home. Sometimes, I’ll pop into my co-working space in the Little Italy neighborhood. It’s one of my favorite corners of the city to eat and caffeinate but mostly, I post up at my dining table. It’s located equidistant from my fridge (gotta eat) and living room (aka my gym as of late). In other words, working from home is incredibly convenient. As exciting and tasty as the destinations I’m lucky to visit are, I personally enjoy returning home to a predictable environment after checking out Nashville’s music scene or Brussel’s art deco architecture for example.

That’s why I’m a big fan of online streaming workouts that prioritize technique and flowy choreography, like Barre3 online’s movement method that hones in on alignment, posture and personalized intensity. I also like that it gives me a curated workout playlist so I don’t have to search for a workout, though I do save and replay my favorites if I’m not into the selected workout of the day.

Body, Breath, Beats 21-Day Yoga Challenge

This month though, I’m adding some of these yoga videos from Wanderlust’s Body, Breath, Beats 21-day yoga challenge. It actually began yesterday (March 4), though each of the 21 videos will be accessible for five days after it goes live. You can also sign up by email for free to get the videos delivered straight to your inbox this month. I have a feeling I’ll enjoy this series as each video focuses on a specific element of a solid yoga practice––breathing, side body work, an entire video dedicated to hip opening poses, and they’re all set to some dreamy instrumental tunes.

UPDATE: After flowing through the first two videos, as someone who has been practicing yoga on and off for a number of years I am finding the verbal cuing a bit fast. However, I do appreciate the constant reminders to take full inhales and exhales. I also like that the flows are no more than 25 minutes, just long enough to stretch out and reset before getting back to my computer.

Sign up for the free 21-day yoga challenge
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In honor of the storm cells passing through San Diego region this weekend, I’m plugging my recent piece published on Medium. It’s a beginner’s guide to visiting an art museum, which is a practical activity to do on a rainy day in San Diego given we’re blessed with more than 300 days of sun a year.

Not only that, but immersing oneself in art may help refine those soft skills too. Skills like critical thinking and empathy.

“It’s good to stretch ourselves,” by working through our discomfort with a work of art we don’t quite understand, notes Anita Feldman from the San Diego Museum of Art.

Art also gives voice to things that are hard to articulate. “An emotion, idea, experience,” says Katherine Hall of the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft. “Art can succeed in this space.”

Read the entire story on Medium here.


Pro tip for San Diego residents: Did you know you can get in free to many museums at Balboa Park? Make sure to bring your ID and check this link to participate in Residents Day at museums including Fleet Science Center, Museum of Photographic Arts, San Diego Museum of Art and more. I’d recommend going early to beat the crowds (learned my lesson at the Japanese Friendship Garden a few years ago!)

Photo: Amazon.com

In 140-characters or less:

On love, survival, compassion and responsibility in WWII Italy.

In haiku:

Loyalty falters

When true desires see the light

Darkness begets grace

Tell me more:

She’s Jewish. He’s about to become a Catholic priest. In Italy, they grew to be friends and throughout Amy Harmon’s novel, are forbidden lovers. It’s also 1943. The Germans are here. Can Eva and Angelo transcend the times to survive and maybe, find each other?

Read this if:

You’re into a good love story without the exaggerated fantasy of typical romance novels.


Interested in more Reading List ideas? Read my thoughts on The People in the Trees and The Girl Who Smiled Beads.


Weekend guide to Oceanside, CA and more recent features

 

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For The National, Amtrak’s onboard magazine I researched and wrote a weekend guide to Oceanside, California. 


 

For October, a beautiful beer meets lifestyle and travel online magazine I connect the dots between Border X Brewing’s Mexican-inspired beers and community-building. READ IT HERE.

Also, super flattered that October’s editor included the piece we worked on together as one of her favorite pieces this year. Check out the full thread at the link below:


 

And for Lonely Planet, where I cover San Diego travel updates, a guide to Christmas activities in the area, including beachside ice skating, holiday menus and more. READ IT HERE.

Photo: Alina Mendoza

Lately, I’ve been thinking a lot about the way I consume information. Like many of us, I spend a lot of time online on my computer and smartphone reading the news, watching videos, scrolling through my social media feeds. That’s a lot of screen time, and for someone who relies daily on email and Google docs and internet research to do my job, and as someone who appreciates good storytelling, I’ve turned to podcasts to inform and entertain me while my eyes catch a break.

Similarly, I’ve increasingly become interested in digital wellness* and how our relationship with technology continues to evolve. In some small way, I consider podcasts an act of self-care; a form of creative nourishment on one hand and an opportunity to unplug from emails and scrolling on the other.

Below are some of my favorites that have served to inspire, teach, entertain and challenge me to consider perspectives beyond my own and immediate surroundings.

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Arriving in Queenstown, New Zealand

I’ve traveled a lot. I was two when my parents put me on a plane to spend the summer with my grandparents on the East Coast. Throughout my childhood, they continued to send me East every other summer. Other times, we bounced from Kaua’i to the other islands, to California, Canada. There was even a South Western road trip before I went to college. These were the days of Mom’s travel binder stuffed with printed MapQuest guides, printed flight and hotel confirmations. Pre-iPhone.

As an adult (or “adult”), I’ve taken short business trips to week long vacations, to even longer working and living situations across the country and abroad.

Below are some things that help me travel with confidence and ease because when we travel, that’s what we want. We want the process to be as painless as possible for our wallets and peace of mind. We want to get right into the experience.

These items help me do that*:

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Lebanese food in Brussels

Given the strength of Europe’s obvious culinary powerhouses like Paris and Barcelona, Brussels may not immediately jump to mind as a foodie destination. But, there’s more to the city’s food scene than Belgian (not French! As is the common refrain in the city) frites and waffles, as I learned during a recent trip with Visit Brussels.

Case in point, the Lebanese feast we tore through in the Ixelles neighborhood that was one of the most memorable meals of the brief, four-day visit. Think creamy hummus, beets, greens and yogurt-based condiments to drizzle or dollop over it all. Don’t forget the pita, and generous pours of Lebanese wine (my first taste).

Eat, converse, imbibe, repeat. It was glorious. And then the meat course came, and for that I was…not prepared. I should have slowed my roll with the hummus!

And yet, the smell of perfectly charred meat––chicken, lamb, whatever––is painful to resist.

Other culinary moments included stopping for Pasteis de Nata (yes, more than one) in between Art Deco and Art Nouveau tours, amusing myself over Brussels’ “Perfect Egg” dish obsession (like the city’s avocado toast, it seemed like the appetizer was everywhere) and stumbling into chocolate mousse by the scoop near Grand Place, a UNESCO World Heritage site.

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You can’t go to Brussels and not have chocolate.

In short, would return, highly recommend and next time, I’m hitting up some of these dishes.


What I'm Reading: The People in the Trees

The People in the Trees is a story about what happens when the quest for immortality unravels humanity’s dark side. It is also a story about what happens when cultures clash; or when one culture imposes itself on another to detrimental consequences.

In Hanya Yanagihara’s novel, the story is told as scientist Norton Perina’s memoir. Perina, our protagonist, discovers a fountain of youth during an anthropological excursion on a remote, thickly forested island in Micronesia. The golden ticket: a special turtle the native population eat when they reach a certain age.

Unfortunately, vitality of body does not equally mean vitality of mind. Those who eat this special turtle live far beyond the normal lifespan, and while the body keeps up physically the mind deteriorates with time.

We follow Perina through discovery, ambition, recognition and a moral reckoning he – and we – must grapple with.

Language runs longer than concise and footnotes throughout – which are annotated by Perina’s friend (lover?!) – read academic, with lots of scientific citations and tangential anecdotes that paint a picture of Perina’s meteoric career and the savory (and not so) characters in his orbit.

Yanagihara’s novel is a literary adventure, and a timely read given current conversation about globalization, the me too movement and environmental concerns.

Read this book to lead your moral compass through its acrobatic paces. The author poses these questions, in an interview with Vogue,

“It’s so easy to affix a one-word description to someone, and it’s so easy for that description to change: if we call someone a genius, and then they become a monster, are they still a genius? How do we assess someone’s greatness: is it what they contribute to society, and is that contribution negated if they also inflict horrible pain on another? Or—as I have often wondered—is it not so binary?”

 

For further reading from Polynesia, check out this insider’s travel guide to Honolulu I wrote for New York magazine or this essay about the breakfast plate in Hawaii that unlocks its multicultural history, for Food 52.

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San Diego may be the eighth largest city in the country, but walkable pockets like Little Italy make it feel cozy and manageable. My mood guides my appetite, and most times I’m in the mood for strong coffee and sweet and savory foods prepared with no-fuss and quality ingredients. I’m also into the sort of places where you can linger as long as you like, and Little Italy is bursting with these establishments.

In the years that I’ve either worked and/or played Downtown, here’s my most-frequented eat and drink list in Little Italy:

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Postcard from: Viñales, Cuba

The Western town of Viñales is elemental, even more so after having spent several consecutive days roaming the lively streets of Havana; all crumbling concrete and precarious structures.

Moody clouds made good on their threat and rain would eventually drench the valley during our day trip. My Keens squelched through mud and side stepped puddles.

The air was grassy, earthy, pure.

In contrast with the mangy dogs and cats in Havana, we watched chickens strut around on unusually long legs and horses swish their tails as they rode past us in a caravan, led by their human counterparts.

Three piglets scampered across our path as we pulled in and out of the organic farm where we’d have lunch and tour their eco-friendly cultivation practices.

Lunch on the farm was a backyard bounty of vegetable soup, fresh chopped salads, roasted chicken and pork, mounds of sweet potato and taro, and the ever-present beans and rice.

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As if being surrounded by expansive fields and farm animals weren’t enough, the red and white checkered table cloth of our communal table seemed to say,

“You’re definitely in the country now.”

It was a welcome type of social networking that can be hard to come by in urban, technologically connected environments. From a privileged, American perspective, it felt luxurious.

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